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Discover the best attractions in Rome. Do not miss the best places to visit in the city.

Bocca della Verità

Bocca della Verità

Bocca della Verità (Mouth of truth) is to be found in the portico of the Basilica of Santa Maria in Cosmedin and is of Rome’s major attractions, each year drawing thousands of visitors. It is a circular marble sculpture of a large face with an open mouth, which was in all likelihood used as drain cover, owes its allure to the superstition according to which the “Bocca della Verità” bites off the hand of anyone not telling the truth. Source: turismoroma.it

How to get to: Bocca della Verità

Cappella Sistina

Capella Sistina

Millions of visitors come to Rome and rush to the Vatican Museums, for the most part to make their way to the Sistine Chapel to stand in awe, necks strained to see the work of a genius. No artist since has come close to the scale, technical skill and majestic composition and design of this masterpiece. Michelangelo’s Last Judgement (1535) painted on the alter wall completes the most powerful cycle of painting in the western world. In the Sistine Chapel the great sculptor became a great painter. Source: rome.info

How to get to: Cappella Sistina

Colonna Traiana

Colonna Traiana

Trajan’s Column is the only monument in the Roman Forum that has reached us practically intact. The column, together with its base, reaches to a height of almost 40m and is an indication of the original height of the ‘saddle’ of the Quirinal Hill, which was cut into to build Trajan’s Forum.
The extraordinary reliefs that cover Trajan’s Column, forming a spiral of almost 200m in portray the victorious military campaigns led by Trajan against the Dacians; conflicts that made the borders on the Danube secure. There are around 2,500 carved figures. On the base are carved trophies of arms and there is a small door behind which a burial chamber once contained an urn with the ashes of Trajan. Source: turismoroma.it

How to get to: Colonna Traiana

Colosseo

Colosseo

Called by the ancient Romans, "Anphitheatrum Flavlum" (Flavian Amphitheatre), the Colosseum is the most famous and impressive monument of ancient Rome, as well as the largest amphitheater in the world. The name is undoubtedly linked to the large size of the building but derives above all from the fact that nearby there was a colossal statue of Nero and bronze. In 1990, the Colosseum, along with all the historical center of Rome, the Vatican extraterritorial zones in Italy and the Basilica of St. Paul Outside the Walls, was listed as a World Heritage Site by UNESCO, while in July 2007 was included among the New seven Wonders of the World. Source: il-colosseo.it

How to get to: Colosseo

Fontana di Trevi

Fontana di Trevi

Work on the celebrated rococo fountain was first begun in 1732 by Nicola Salvi (who beat off competition to be awarded the commission by Pope Clement XII) and was completed by Giuseppe Pannini in 1762. Before moving off, do not forget to throw a coin in the fountain. Custom has it that travellers doing this will one day return to the eternal city. Those seeking a little romance, perhaps even an Italian love, should then toss a second, third coin to make sure wedding bells will soon be chiming. Source: turismoroma.it

How to get to: Fontana di Trevi 

Foro Romano

Foro Romano

Situated in the valley between the Palatine hill and the Capitol Hill, it consists of a square of almost trapezoidal form between the Regia and the Rostra on the short sides, and the Emilia and Giulia Basilicas on the long ones. An extension of the northern part is represented by the Comitium.
The square was created as a place for commercial exchanges and political and judicial activities at the point where important roads (the Via Sacra, the Vicus Tuscus, the Vicus Jugarius, the Clivus Capitolinus, and the Argiletum) converged. the Forum was abandoned and buried under a thick layer of earth, becoming a pasture known as Campo Vaccino. Source: turismoroma.it

How to get to: Foro Romano

Museo Napoleonico

Musei Vaticani

The Napoleonic Museum is a rare example of a museum, where it is possible to explore through history spanning over a century. The artworks on show reconstruct the impressive undertaking by emperors and famous personalities, as well as works linked to everyday history, items that were in common use, and private memoires. The paintings celebrating the Napoleonic feats are displayed alongside the keepsakes and memorabilia of people that have long since been forgotten by time. Source: turismoroma.it

How to get to: Museo Napoleonico

Pantheon

Pantheon

Dedicated to the worship of every god (Pan-every Theon-divinity), the Pantheon was built by the Emperor Hadrian between 118 and 125 A.D. over the ruins of another temple dating back to 27 A.D. On the inside, our attention is caught straightaway by a ray of slanting sunlight shooting down from the “oculus”, a 9- meter round aperture at the very top of the dome that illuminates the entire building. Source: turismoroma.it

How to get to: Pantheon

Piazza di Spagna

Piazza Spagna

The Piazza di Spagna is one of the most popular meeting places in Rome. It is also one of the most visually pleasing squares. The combination of a monumental staircase (the famous Spanish Steps), an obelisk and a beautiful church is a draw for tourists and photographers. The Piazza di Spagna (Spanish Square) is connected to the Trinità dei Monti, a French church situated atop a hill, via a long staircase, the Scalinata della Trinità dei Monti, better known as the Spanish Steps. Source: aviewoncities.com

How to get to: Piazza di Spagna

Piazza Navona

Piazza Navona

Undeniably the most elegant and cheerful of all Roman piazzas, it was built on the site of Stadium of Domitian in the 1st Century A.D. and still preserves its outline. The piazza remains a highly popular meeting place for Romans and tourists alike, who drowsily soak up the sun and atmosphere in open air bars dotted around it. Used in ancient times for various athletic games and competitions, although it never witnessed the carnage offered in the Colosseum, today tourists often enjoy sitting for street artists who, on request,  in a few minutes either sketch a faithful portrait or draw a caricature of their models. Source: turismoroma.it

How to get to: Piazza Navona